Finding the Right Data

“Data! Data! Data! I can’t make bricks without clay!”

-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Sir Conan Doyle’s famous fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, couldn’t form any theories or draw any conclusions until he had sufficient data. Data is the basic building block of everything we do in analytics: the reports we build, the analysis we perform, the decisions we influence, and the optimizations we derive.

Finding the Right Data at the Right Time

Back at Wells Fargo, the single greatest attribute that made me successful was my ability to size up how long it would take to deliver something. Knowing what data I would need, where I would find it and how long it would take to analyze it to come up with something useful made me somewhat of a wizard in the minds of the team.

Finding the right data at the right time requires one to first know ends and outs of their data. You have to know how the data is captured, where it is stored and how it makes its way to you. Knowing the data architecture in your business is the key.

So you have to get to know the people who know where your data comes from and how it gets there. Learn from them. Partner with them. Buy them doughnuts.

A few years ago I came across an analogy being used to describe data in a business. That of a data lake. A data lake is the living, breathing, evolving pool of all the data in a business. If you have a good data architecture, and you can navigate it fairly easily, then you have a data lake. Ideally, your business has data structured in such a way you can live off it. Data to a business is like water to living things… it sustains life

So once you have the lake mapped out, then you have to learn how to fish it. Knowing where the fish are biting is another key. Once you know what data you need, you have to know how to get to it quickly.

I can’t stress this enough. No matter how good you are at analysis, or what tool you are using to do the analysis, if you don’t have an understanding of what happens to the data before it gets to you then you are probably not drinking from a clean lake.

Business Intelligence tools help us here. As does coding languages to extract data from a database. These are your fishing tools. You have to practice using them to be good at getting the right data at the right time.

Another way to optimize your data search is to save your work. Of as I call it leave yourself breadcrumbs. Save the query. Cut and paste the code into a document and save it. Write down the steps. Whatever you need to do to replicate what you just did so you can do it again in the future without starting over from scratch.

So to recap, if you know data structure, you understand how data is stored and you leave yourself clues to do things faster next time.

Now the other part of the equation is knowing if the data you are using is the right data. Finding data quickly doesn’t do you any good if you bring back the wrong data.

So, how do you know if the data you are using is the right data to be using?

I can’t count the number of times I asked myself that question. In general, just about every new analysis or project or research or whatever it is you are using data for, you have to ask that question at some point.

Even data you have used a hundred times and comes from a highly trusted source needs to be scrutinized.

Now if you work with data every day in a familiar format, from the same source and with no changes to the data gathering and storage process you don’t have to spend much time validating it. Usually you will see problems when something just doesn’t look right when you are doing the analysis.

On the other hand, things get a whole lot trickier when you are using data from a source you don’t use often, or something has changed in the way the data is populated or if it’s the first time you are using the data.

When this happens, I have a few suggestions on how to validate the data.

· First off, pull the data, do your analysis and draw some conclusions. If it passed the eye test and it feels ok to you, then your job is just to validate it.

· One simple way to do this is pull the data again the exact same way to make sure you get the exact same data. Or change one parameter like the dates used in the query. See if that significantly alters the way the data looks and feels.

· Another option is to have someone else do the same thing independently. See if they get the same results you do. You can also find someone who knows the data to look over your work to see if it makes sense to them.

In the end, whatever you do, make sure you have the right data.

I will cover all these concepts in more in upcoming my training classes. For a list of training events, please visit www.sonicanalytics.com

I’ll be conducting the following business analytics trainings over the next few months:

· June 5 in Ortigas (Metro Manila, Philippines)

· July 17, in Pleasant Hlll, CA (San Francisco Bay Area, US)

· August 22, in Bonifacio Global City (Metro Manila, Philippines)

Dan Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics training, consulting and outsourcing company with offices in Manila and the San Francisco Bay Area. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought after public speakers in Asia and has recently begun offering public training seminars in the United States.

We need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). So he has started an internship program under Sonic Analytics to empower the youth the use Analytic, plan Strategy and Present their views… ASP!

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized business looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities.

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What is Business Analytics? In Most Cases It’s Simply Excel & 3 Bullet Points

Business Analytics refers to the skills, technologies, practices for continuous iterative exploration and investigation of past business performance to gain insight, discover opportunities and/or drive business planning. *https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analytics

The most common form of analytics is business analytics that are generally used by senior leaders and decision-makers to investigate problems, validate assumptions and to guide strategic planning.

Business analysts are therefore the most common type of analyst. If you do a job search on the title analyst, as many as half the posting will likely be business analysts. However, analytics can be used in an almost limitless number of business functions in specific areas like HR, recruitment, marketing, finance, and so on. Each one can have its very own analyst.

I was a business analyst for a large part of my career at Wells Fargo, but even before I had analyst in my title I was heavily involved in business analysis. Why?

Because I know how to use Excel.

It’s amazing how many people are scared of Excel. To many highly educated and successful business leaders across Corporate America, making a pivot table in Excel is like magic.

If you were able to take an honest survey of managers and supervisors across the country (world actually), you would probably be quite surprised by the high percentage who would prefer to find someone else to analyze their data.

That’s one of the biggest reasons business analysts are so prevalent.

Another is time.

I had a boss at one point that grilled into me the philosophy that no matter how much data you have, and how complex the analysis, it’s all worthless if you can’t boil it down to 2–3 bullet points.

That’s all he had time for.

3 Bullet Points!

So being a successful business analyst really require 2 skills; Excel and condensing data into 3 bullet points.

If you can do that, you’ll go far.

I did.

A business needs analysts to make sense of big data, manage the storage of the data, and know when to use which of the 4 types of analytics (descriptive, diagnostic, predictive, and prescriptive). To be effective, analysts need to have business intelligence tools to create data visualizations and build business dashboards.

I will cover all these concepts in more in upcoming my training classes. For a list of training events, please visit www.sonicanalytics.com

I’ll be conducting the following business analytics trainings over the next few months:

· June 5 in Ortigas (Metro Manila, Philippines)

· July 17, in Pleasant Hlll, CA (San Francisco Bay Area, US)

· August 22, in Bonifacio Global City (Metro Manila, Philippines)

· September 4, Rancho Cucamonga (North of Los Angeles, US)

Dan Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics training, consulting and outsourcing company with offices in Manila and the San Francisco Bay Area. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought after public speakers in Asia and has recently begun offering public training seminars in the United States.

We need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). So he has started an internship program under Sonic Analytics to empower the youth the use Analytic, plan Strategy and Present their views… ASP!

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized business looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities.

Getting Started With Analytics

The primary people responsible for conducting analytics on the massive amounts of data we have today are analysts.

Analysts are skilled in using various technologies and methodologies to identify, inventory and integrate large amounts of data quickly.

A general definition of an analyst is a person who analyzes or who is skilled in analysis. Analysts examine things carefully and in detail so as to identify causes, key factors, possible results, etc. generally using a process of identifying, inventorying and integrating data. *http://www.dictionary.com/analyst

I often hear that most analysts today feel like they are drowning in a sea of data. They need to know how to take control of their data and analysis to quickly answer business questions and make critical decisions. They want to confidently present results and solutions to their managers, colleagues and clients.

You most likely clicked to this page because you fit the description above. If that is the case, then you made a good decision. 😉

All kidding aside, I have designed a method to help you look at analytics in a way that will make data and analysis easier to understand and conduct. My trainings and published content will also instruct you on how to share data in a more dynamic and influential way.

Analysts have been around a long time, but recent technological advances have both allowed us to produce and capture more data as well as give us the ability to analyze immense data sets quickly. Thus we are amidst a huge boom in the applications of analytics and the need for analytics talent across the globe. Analytics is something just about every business leader is trying to figure out how to use more effectively in their business. To add to our challenge, the demand for good analysts is booming just as fast as the explosion in big data.

As a result, there is a huge shortage of people who are skilled in working with data to answer questions and solve problems. This is why you have seen the number of analyst job postings increasing at an amazing rate. In fact the quickening demand for analytics talent has made it very hard for most businesses to find good analysts.

If you are a business leader, manager, owner, and/or executive are not actively trying to surround yourself with analysts and if you are not infusing an analytics centric culture in your business, you will most likely soon see your business fail.

Keep in mind that analytics is about looking for patterns in data to help answer questions. Most businesses use analytics to help ensure more data-driven decision-making.

The primary people responsible for conducting analytics on the massive amounts of data we have today are analysts. Do you have analysts on your team?

Analysts are skilled in using various technologies and methodologies to identify, inventory and integrate large amounts of data quickly. Are you an analyst yourself?

If you answered yes to either question, but you feel you need more training for yourself or your team, you are not alone.

A business needs analysts to make sense of big data, manage the storage of the data, and know when to use which of the 4 types of analytics (descriptive, diagnostic, predictive, and prescriptive). To be effective, analysts need to have business intelligence tools to create data visualizations and build business dashboards.

I will cover all these concepts in more in upcoming my training classes. The classes are designed specifcally for people new to analytics and for business leaders looking to upgrade the level of analytics in their business.

For a list of training events, please visit www.sonicanalytics.com

Upcoming Training Dates

· June 5 in Ortigas (Metro Manila, Philippines)

· July 17, in Pleasant Hlll, CA (San Francisco Bay Area, US)

· August 14, Rancho Cucamonga (North of Los Angeles, US)

· August 22, in Bonifacio Global City (Metro Manila, Philippines)

My goal with this series is to help you look at analytics in a way that will make data and analysis easier to understand and conduct.

Dan Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics training, consulting and outsourcing company with offices in Manila and the San Francisco Bay Area. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought after public speakers in Asia and has recently begun offering public training seminars in the United States.

We need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). So he has started an internship program under Sonic Analytics to empower the youth the use Analytic, plan Strategy and Present their views… ASP!

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized business looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities.

DMAIPH HR Analytics Strategy Lead

HR Analytics Strategy Lead

DMAIPH is an international analytics firm with offices in both the U.S. and the Philippines that specializes in providing analytics themed training, consulting and outsourcing to its clients.

DMAIPH also conducts analytics training classes facilitated by our President & Founder, Daniel Meyer. Mr. Meyer is an author, public speaker and one of the most sought after analytics experts in the Philippines. Over the past 5 years, Mr. Meyer has trained 1,000s of Filipinos on a variety of analytics topics. We are currently building out a marketing and analytics team to grow the training business line.

We currently employee over 60 employees here in the Philippines who are assigned to providing customer service, email support and graphic design work for a U.S. based client. This account is a mature account, having been established in 2013. This specific role will work directly with the marketing and analytics teams of DMAIPH and support the broader HR efforts for the other DMAIPH lines of business.

The role of the HR Analytics Strategy Lead has four primary functions;

  • 25% HR Generalist (Comp/Ben, Contracts, Recruitment, etc)
  • 25% HR Analytics Technical Trainer
  • 25% HR Analytics Projects
  • 25% HR Analytics Resource Speaker

Job Requirements:

  • At least 3 years of of HR work experience.
  • Experience in the BPO industry is a plus.
  • Four-year degree holder in an HR, related course preferred, but any undergraduate experience is acceptable.
  • Intermediate MS Excel skills.
  • A strong interest in analytics; using data to driven decision-making.
  • Experience with corporate training, public speaking and/or classroom teaching strongly preferred.
  • An Above average level of English proficiency.
  • A pleasant attitude and professional appearance.
  • A curious mind. Successful candidates will be able to demonstrate how they enjoy solving problems and looking for innovative solutions.

Job Duties:

HR Generalist (25%) – serving as an HR Generalist (Recruitment, Compensation & Benefits, and Employee Engagement) for a team of 10-15 marketing and analytics employees. Will also work with HR staff from DMAIPH business partners responsible for other DMAIPH teams.

HR Analytics Technical Trainer (25%) – will work alongside other DMAIPH trainers to deliver content specifically designed for HR Analytics training activities. Initially working with content already developed, over time the lead may develop their own content under the guidance of senior DMAIPH staff.

HR Analytics Projects (25%) – will work on ad hoc and ongoing analytics projects aligned with industry and academic needs to massively upskill HR staff. Will conduct research, prepare reports and deliver findings to DMAIPH management and key business partners.

HR Analytics Resource Speaker (25%) – will be assigned speaking roles at various academic and industry events where as needed. Content will be provided. Over time will become a spokesperson and champion for furthering the use of HR analytics in the Philippines.

Please note that we are not expecting successful candidates to already have work experience in all of these areas. There will be a large amount of training, coaching and mentoring to get the Talent Management Analyst up to speed. Above all else we are looking for someone who is curious, who is flexible and who can take initiative.

Compensation:

  • Starting salary depends on experience, but the position base is targeted at 30,000 PHP a month.
  • After probationary period, health benefits and paid leave will be made available (probation can last between 1 to 6 months).
  • Additional performance based incentives can be achieved for filling training classes and meeting HR metrics goals.
  • Up to P2,500 in tax-free allowances.
  • Possible 5-10% performance bonus upon normalization.
  • Complete 40 hours of work. This is a full-time job commitment.
  • Annual performance evaluation and compensation increases.
  • Standard employee benefits as mandated by Philippine law.
  • Company lap top and mobile phone may also be provided.

Location:

This position is primary office based, but will be able to work remotely a significant % of the time once past probationary status. There will be a need to go into the field to attend job fairs, DMAIPH training events and occasional conference and workshops. There may also be a need to report to our Ortigas office for meetings and trainings. During the onboarding and probationary period, the HR Analytics Strategy Lead may be required to come into the office regularly until they are fully up to speed.

Interested applicants please send your resume and contact details directly to me at danmeyer@dmaiph.com

The Analytics Education Drive in the Philippines

Article by AAP Business Analyst, Ludilyn Pridas

The Asian Institute of Management (AIM) recently conducted a free Master Class last January 15-17, 2018 about the application and use cases of Data Science to different fields. It was also a venue for them to provide more information and some insight about the relevance and competitiveness of their newly proposed course, the MS in Data Science (MSDS) Program. The Master Classes aimed to provide some perspective on role of Data Science in the business world today.

During the second day, AIM focused on the applications relevant to the Finance and Banking sectors. The session which was primarily conducted by the Institute’s MSDS Program Director Erika Legara, PhD. She talked about the place of data science in business and emphasized on the importance of the data scientist’s ability to communicate his/her findings to the business decision makers effectively.  Let me highlight some of the things I found particularly relevant.  A good data science team is crucial to leveraging on company curated data as most often than not, good amounts of historical data are left untouched or under-utilized. This is because people in the business are rarely equipped to handle data, more so transform and use it through modelling.  Aside from this, it was also emphasized that analytical knowledge alone will not be enough to achieve success for the business. A data scientist should also have domain knowledge on the relevant business alongside his/her data analytics skill set and techniques. The combination of both is needed to effectively revolutionize one’s business. To sum it all, AIMs seminar was a great opportunity to get an introduction on data science and its relevance, as we know that the Philippines is now adapting to keep up with the trend.

In 2013, the Commision on Higher Education (CHED) released a memo outlining the guidelines and policies for the launching of specialized courses in business analytics targeted towards students who are taking up Business Administration and Information Technology. The goal of this endeavor is to prepare students for the big global analytics wave which will likely open up a lot of career opportunities. In fact upon the release of the memo, various schools expressed their interest to add this new program to their curriculum such as the University of the Philippines – Diliman, Ateneo de Manila University, De La Salle University, Asia Pacific College and University of Santo Tomas, among others. The visualization below shows the list of schools that have expressed interest in launching their own Data Science and Analytics programs. (Click the visualization below to open and interact with it in a separate tab).

Teaching Analytics

 

Similar to AIM and the abovementioned schools, the Analytics Association of the Philippines (AAP) also aims to shed light on the relevance of analytics to businesses and the overall economy. As an enabling organization, we aim to come up with a unified ecosystem in the Philippines where industry, the academe, and practitioners meet and find synergies. By helping mobilize trainings and programs for Filipinos that focus on how to upskill in analytics with strong regard for business domain knowledge, we hope to facilitate the creation of a new breed of data scientists that can really revolutionize organizations.  Quoting the popular magazine-format newspaper, The Economist, the world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil but data. In line with this and the objective of the AAP, we serve to help individuals optimize their practice and remain well-informed about the developments of the field to make their work more valuable to them and their respective organizations. We hope to complement the efforts of AIM and other educational institutions as we take on the same objective of upskilling Filipinos. The AAP undertakes this mission through massive and inter-regional projects throughout the Philippines, hopefully reaching the seams, and making it available to all who are eager to learn.

How Do We Make Globalization Work For Every Filipino? We Need To Massively Upskill!

In the Philippines we see many pros and cons of Globalization first hand.

The BPO Industry and the OFW culture has given millions of Filipinos access to jobs that provide higher salaries and economic opportunities that they might now have been able to find locally.

However, these two economic trends have also caused a brain drain, where any of the best and the brightest of the Filipino workforce is not engaged in helping better the Philippines directly.

It’s a double edged sword, but I for one think up until now the pros have been worth the cons and we have seen a growing middle class in the Philippines that didn’t exist 20 years ago.

However, the Philippines still remains on the whole a fairly poverty stricken country. Wealth distribution is a major problem. Many economic indicators show the Philippines economy being one of the shining stars of Asia, but on the streets of Manila the average Filipino is not really seeing the benefits of this growth. Still, its indisputable that for millions of Filipinos Globalization has been a benefit in raising their economic quality of life.

In addition, most of the jobs that OFWs and BPO workers take on are jobs that hard, manual process intensive, and do not require tech skills which cannot easily be replaced by A.I.  There is little doubt that most of new jobs being created today require tech skills that most of the current work force does not have. The ability of the education system in the Philippines to prepare the next generation workforce with tech skills is also not where it could be.

Answers to these challenges will come with investing a lot more in upskill training and curriculum redesign to provide Filipinos with 21st Century Skills. And that is why I founded DMAIPH and am part of the AAP.

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Analytics Leadership – DMAIPH is a founding member of the Analytics Association of the Philippines (AAP.PH) and specializes in arming the Data-Driven Leader with the tools and techniques they need to build and empower an analytics centric organization.

Analytics leadership requires a mastery of not just analytics skill, but also of nurturing an analytics culture. We have guided thousands of Filipino professionals to become better analytics leaders. Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to discuss a uniquely tailored strategy to ensure you are the top of your game when it comes to Analytics Leadership. #AAPMoonshot #DataRockPinas

Analytics Jobs of the Future (1st in a Series)

Jobs of the Future for analytics will be mid-high level jobs and rapidly replace low-skilled analytics jobs that are now fairly common here in the Philippines. 

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Original content created by Jacqueline Belmonte, Assistant to the Executive Director of the Analytics Association of the Philippines. 

Analytics jobs have been increasingly changing as of late as technology changes, but how does Analytics perform in the larger landscape? This research is conducted to provide a view on Analytics as a growing job field in the Philippines. The research also aims to discuss Analytics as a recognized field today, used by 53% of companies to optimize their data into valuable insights for decision-making, targeting higher number by 2022.

In fact, APEC (the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation), predicts that analytics jobs will more than double in the Philippines in the net 5 years.

APEC_500K

The Era of Data has shifted the jobs of today and of the future as new technologies revolutionize the way how businesses deliver their products and services.

The customer experience has been the most important factor in retaining customers and is evident on how creative companies have been to stand among competition. Digging into customer’s activity will uncover customer behavior patterns that could be used in marketing.

In-demand mid-high skill & lucrative jobs are already starting to be significant in the market place here. Replacing the low skill jobs over time will be a challenge though, as the Philippines does not have enough talent to meet the industry demand hence, a looming analytics talent shortage.

A significant chunk of employed population with low skill and repetitive tasks will also be affected due to innovations like Artificial Intelligence if they will not upskill themselves to learning more complex skills like Data Science and Analytics.

The disruption of technology to the traditional business process can be mitigated with immediate communication of what’s about to happen and how to cope with it as an individual and an organization. Efforts will need to come from the industry, academe and government, working together

And that is where DMAIPH and the AAP come in.

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DMAIPH is a founding member of the Analytics Association of the Philippines (AAP.PH) and specializes in arming the Data-Driven Leader with the tools and techniques they need to build and empower an analytics centric organization. Analytics leadership requires a mastery of not just analytics skill, but also of nurturing an analytics culture.

We have guided thousands of Filipino professionals to become better analytics leaders. Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to discuss a uniquely tailored strategy to ensure you are the top of your game when it comes to Analytics Leadership.

Upcoming Events

Big Data Bacolod: https://web.facebook.com/events/718011925036202/

Big Data Analytics 3.0: https://web.facebook.com/events/1750508601681363/

Analytics for HR Managers: https://web.facebook.com/events/227273664479530/

Hunting For Those Missing Elements – Massive Analytics Upskilling

One of the best things about bringing new people on board is that you tend to get pretty insightful feedback.

Let me show you why I really value a fresh pair of eyes as I try and lead my team of analysts in our advocacy to conduct massive upskill training in the Philippines.

Thanks to Ludz Pridas, a new business analyst on the AAP Analytics Team, for creating most of the content below.

On one hand it’s refreshing to know that all of these observations are things we are actively working on. On the other, it can be little frustrating that we haven’t worked them all out yet to a point where the whole team see the big picture.

So that is my first missing element I need to focus on, upping the level of internal communication. Not easy with a team that works virtually a lot. We use Trello, that helps. We have monthly strategy meetings, but probably need to have them a little more frequently.

Another “missing element for us to do a massive training is the opportunity for advancement, a llack of advances towards other training”… the ecosystems is very fragmented. As the number of training options and academic programs focused on analytics grows, so does the difficulty for someone looking to upskill.

Unification of the ecosystem is a top priority of the AAP as we set up partnership agreements with various other organizations. Advocating for standards built around the APEC Data Science & Analytics Core Competencies Map helps. But we need to do a lot of networking and storytelling to build a successful framework for someone to easily determine which upskill option is the right one for them.

We also have to both make things simpler and add more complexity. It is even harder to pull this off then it sounds. Most people looking for analytics training are pretty new to many of the concepts used by cutting edge analytics teams. And a lot of people needing the training simply aren’t numbers people. So we need to keep things fairly layman.

At the same time we need to use the framework to help people easily level up and progress. That cant all be done in person. So online tools will be essential, and there are a lot in the works. Also additional resources for self-guided learning need to be developed and shared.

And the final point that Ludz pointed out to me is “the lack of trainers to teach analytics, to guide the audience beyond our standard 2 days of fundamentals. It’s just not enough to learn all the stuff about analytics quickly.”

Yes, that is why we are gonna do a run of the Train the Trainer in Bacolod in Feb and are working to set up a fun of Train the HR Trainer early in 2018, and another run of Train the Trainer in Davao in April. A large part of my time this coming year will be spent growing the numbers of experts.

By my calculations, to train 500,000 Filipinos by the end of 2022, we will need about 10,000 experts to conduct various types of training.

As I said at the top, these are things we know. We just need to get better at talking about them to a point where everyone involved gets it. That’s who advocacies from one man shouting in the wilderness, to a society of learners working together to optimize the use of data across the county.

Interested in helping the AAP achieved our analytics moonshot? I hope so because it gonna take all of us.

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Analytics Leadership – DMAIPH is a founding member of the Analytics Association of the Philippines (AAP.PH) and specializes in arming the Data-Driven Leader with the tools and techniques they need to build and empower an analytics centric organization. Analytics leadership requires a mastery of not just analytics skill, but also of nurturing an analytics culture. We have guided thousands of Filipino professionals to become better analytics leaders.

Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to discuss a uniquely tailored strategy to ensure you are the top of your game when it comes to Analytics Leadership.

 

 

 

The AAP Analytics Internship Matching Program

Innovating the Data Science & Analytics Internship Experience in the Philippines.

The Analytics Association of the Philippines will offer a Data Science and Analytics Internship matching program for Filipino students and employers. The AAP will serve as a conduit and catalyst bridging theory and application to ensure value to the company as well.

Our program has been developed to address 3 current challenges facing students and employers when it comes to data science and analytics themed internships:

  • students are often given menial tasks that do not apply knowledge / learned theory
  • mechanisms do not address disconnect between areas of interest and areas of need
  • companies are not able to effectively identify parts of the value chain that can be assigned to interns while causing no substantial risk to the business’ operations

By enrolling in the AAP DSA Internship Matching Program, students will be matched with employers that provide opportunities to learn and practice DSA skills that are in high demand in the workforce. Students can also be fast tracked for employment post-graduation by their match in a more continuous process.

By enrolling in the AAP DSA Internship Matching Program, employers will be matched with students that are committed to learning DSA skills that can add value to the employer’s business as well as provide a more seamless path to career placement.

Employers will also be encouraged to take a more active role in providing, business cases, data sets and resource speakers for the programs the students they are matched with come from. By being more involved with their students before and after the internship, the bridge between academia and industry will be optimized.

To this end we have developed the following process that will kick off on January 15,2018:

  • Students apply for OJT matching with AAP
  • Employers apply for OJT matching with AAP
  • AAP Matches students and employers based on profiles
  • AAP conducts orientation for students and employers
  • AAP provides online resources to both students and employers

The AAP will assess partner schools and their respective tracks and courses that could work on analytics (end-to-end of value chain) The AAP will also define areas of expertise of each program based on the APEC DSA Competencies and the AAP DSA Framework. Students will be interviewed and vetted.

Additionally, the AAP will provide a matrix of industry partners and corresponding needs (with parts of the value chain, doesn’t have to be siloed, can cover multiple parts)

As for the employer, they will:

  • Define problems/needs (could be something students can work on parallel to an existing team effort)
  • Define final output (paper/study, running program, a presentation, proposal, working product, solution)

As for the schools, they will:

  • Provide 1-2 professors to assist in mentorship
  • Conduct processing of internship experience to give feedback to AAP

Overall our goal is to offer a unique value proposition by facilitating internships with a view of work as an end-to-end process that involves deep-diving into a specific problem or project of the company. The companies enrolled in our program get real value out of internships besides serving as a marketing tool.

With our network of industry partners, prestigious academic institutions and analytics thoughts leaders, the AAP is well positioned to facilitate significant change in the way analysts and data scientists are born.

Our Analytics Internship Matching Program will go a long way in providing tomorrow’s workforce with in demand skills that employers covet, which in turn will allow the Philippines to be a world leader in analytics talent.

Most of the credit for the content of this post goes to Mel Awit, the AAP Analytics Manager. 

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DMAIPH is a founding member of the Analytics Association of the Philippines (AAP.PH) and specializes in arming the Data-Driven Leader with the tools and techniques they need to build and empower an analytics centric organization. Analytics leadership requires a mastery of not just analytics skill, but also of nurturing an analytics culture. We have guided thousands of Filipino professionals to become better analytics leaders. Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to discuss a uniquely tailored strategy to ensure you are the top of your game when it comes to Analytics Leadership.

 

 

Upskilling 500,000 Will Require 1,000 Trainers… Where To Start?

So when I start talking about the AAP Analytics Moonshot of up skill training 500,000 Filipinos in Data Science and Analytics skills over the next 5 years, one of the central questions I face is who will do the training?

Well, that’s easy. People who are right now doing analytics everyday. The hard part is getting the ready to be trainers. To know how to present material, assess if the material is being understood, handling questions and managing the training environment are not things a lot of professional analysts are used to doing.

So we basically take the Fundamentals of Analytics, and we turn the course into a train the trainer exercise, where we apply teaching methods and training skills to the 1,000 DSA experts. Then they can go forth and conduct trainings on a scale that gets us to the 500,000 goal.

So what is the Fundamentals of Analytics? Well, its a method I developed to teach fresh grads and young professionals the basics of business analytics in a short period of time.

The course material, when combined with case studies and hands on exercises, can take some quite unfamiliar with analytics and get them to shift their mindset to thinking data first.

I call my method, Getting IT: The 3 I’s and the 3 T’s of Analytics.

Getting IT Picture1

I borrow the concept of the 3 I’s from a book called the Accidental Analyst. 

Getting IT Picture2

To train someone to be an analyst you need to make them aware of how to find the right data, how to analyze it and how to share it. The 3 I’s.

For analytics to work, you have to have a combination of good talent, technology and technique.

It’s really that simple.

As you discuss any analytics case study or approach any hands on exercise using real data, you plan the 3 I’s and you assess how to use the 3 T’s.

Now take someone who is already an analyst and get them to be able to explain this concept, have them draw from their own experience and their own set of skills, and you have the recipe for a moonshot.

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Analytics Leadership – DMAIPH is a founding member of the Analytics Association of the Philippines (AAP.PH) and specializes in arming the Data-Driven Leader with the tools and techniques they need to build and empower an analytics centric organization. Analytics leadership requires a mastery of not just analytics skill, but also of nurturing an analytics culture. We have guided thousands of Filipino professionals to become better analytics leaders.

Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to discuss a uniquely tailored strategy to ensure you are the top of your game when it comes to Analytics Leadership.