Finding the Right Data at the Right Time

Sir Conan Doyle’s famous fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, couldn’t form any theories or draw any conclusions until he had sufficient data. Data is the basic building block of everything we do in analytics: the reports we build, the analysis we perform, the decisions we influence, and the optimizations we derive.

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Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes

Several years ago I came across a book called the Accidental Analyst (*www.accidentalanalyst.com). The book opens with the questions, “Are you drowning in a sea of data? Would you like to take control of your data and analysis to quickly answer your business questions and make critical decisions? Do you want to confidentially present results and solutions to your managers, colleagues, clients and the public?”

Written by two Stanford professors, the book explores how and why people become good analysts and goes into detail about how to approach analytics successfully. After reading the book I was inspired to come up with a way to teach analytics to college students and fresh graduates.

The core of both the book and my program hinges on the ability of an analyst to find the right data at the right time. The authors suggested that identifying your data is where it all starts. Identifying exactly what you need to address whatever it is that you need to report.

Back at Wells Fargo, the single greatest attribute that I had that made me successful was my ability to size up how long it would take to deliver something. Knowing what data I would need, where I would find it and how long it would take to analyze it to come up with something useful made me somewhat of a wizard in the minds of the team.

Finding the right data at the right time requires one to first know ends and outs of their data. You have to know how the data is captured, where it is stored and how it makes its way to you. Knowing the data architecture in your business is the key.

So you have to get to know the people who know where your data comes from and how it gets there. Learn from them. Partner with them. Buy them doughnuts.

A couple of years ago I came across an analogy being used to describe data in a business. That of a data lake. A data lake is the living, breathing, evolving pool of all the data in a business. If you have a good data architecture, and you can navigate it fairly easily, then you have a data lake. Ideally, your business has data structured in such a way you can live off it. Data to a business is like water to living things… it sustains life

So once you have the lake mapped out, then you have to learn how to fish it. Knowing where the fish are biting is another key. Once you know what data you need, you have to know how to get to it quickly.

Business Intelligence tools help us here. As does coding languages to extract data from a database. These are your fishing tools. You have to practice using them to be good at getting the right data at the right time.

Another way to optimize your data search is to save your work. Of as I call it leave yourself breadcrumbs. Save the query. Cut and paste the code into a document and save it. Write down the steps. Whatever you need to do to replicate what you just did so you can do it again in the future without starting over from scratch.

So to recap, if you know data structure, you understand how data is stored and you leave yourself clues to do things faster next time.
Now the other part of the equation is knowing if the data you are using is the right data. Finding data quickly doesn’t do you any good if you bring back the wrong data.

So, how do you know if the data you are using is the right data to be using?
I can’t count the number of times I asked myself that question. In general, just about every new analysis or project or research or whatever it is you are using data for, you have to ask that question at some point.

Even data you have used a hundred times and comes from a highly trusted source needs to be scrutinized.

Now if you work with data every day in a familiar format, from the same source and with no changes to the data gathering and storage process you don’t have to spend much time validating it. Usually you will see problems when something just doesn’t look right when you are doing the analysis.

On the other hand, things get a whole lot trickier when you are using data from a source you don’t use often, or something has changed in the way the data is populated or if it’s the first time you are using the data.

When this happens, I have a few suggestions on how to validate the data.

  • First off, pull the data, do your analysis and draw some conclusions. If it passed the eye test and it feels ok to you, then your job is just to validate it.
  • One simple way to do this is pull the data again the exact same way to make sure you get the exact same data. Or change one parameter like the dates used in the query. See if that significantly alters the way the data looks and feels.
  • Another option is to have someone else do the same thing independently. See if they get the same results you do. You can also find someone who knows the data to look over your work to see if it makes sense to them.
  • Whatever you do, the best way to prevent publishing or using bad data is to involve someone else. Not always possible, I know, but it’s the best way to go.

Another suggestion is to (1) get the data, (2) do some analysis, and then (3) step away for a while. Come back to it with fresh eyes. Don’t let our minds play tricks on us by making us see what we want to see and not what is really there.

I have seen several articles showing research that most time doing data analysis is actually spent cleaning data. In a lot of businesses, the data lake has become a data swamp, clogged with bad or unusable data. As the % of unstructured data increases daily, it’s easy to see how data swamps have become the norm. Even the most robust data collection and mining can run afoul if the data is not trustworthy.

I can’t stress this enough. No matter how good you are at analysis, or what tool you are using to do the analysis, if you don’t have an understanding of what happens to the data before it gets to you then you are probably not drinking from a clean lake.

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DMAIPH – Decision-making, Analytics & Intelligence Philppines

Over the past few years businesses in the Philippines have invested heavily in big data, analytics and data science, but still have not achieved the expected outcomes of data-driven companies.

Based on our learnings from the 100’s of Filipino businesses and 10,000s of Filipinos who have taken part in DMAIPH Analytics trainings all across the country, we have crafted a proven,  non-technical approach to upskilling your team in analytics.

In 2019, we will be launching two new training programs: (1) Our DMAIPH Applied Analytics Master Class series for executives, leaders and decision-makers and our (2) DMAIPH Applied Analytics Boot Camp series for practicing analysts.

We will feature case studies of real Filipino run business, exercises based on actual analytics challenges being solved by Filipino analysts, and provide you with a copy of my book, Putting Your Data to Work, an analytics guidebook for the Filipino professional

Connect with us via our marketing partner, http://www.sonicanalytics.com to learn about upcoming analytics trainings and events. 

 

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From Putting Your Data to Work… A Basic Overview of Analytics

Analytics is about looking for patterns in data to help answer questions. Most businesses use analytics to help ensure more data-driven decision-making.

The primary people responsible for conducting analytics on the massive amounts of data we have today are analysts. Analysts are skilled in using various technologies and methodologies to identify, inventory and integrate large amounts of data quickly.

Many Analysts today feel like they are drowning in a sea of data. They need to know how to take control of their data and analysis to quickly answer business questions and make critical decisions. They want to confidently present results and solutions to their managers, colleagues and clients.

You should get started by building a baseline understanding of analytics. The term analytics can often be used interchangeably with statistics and data science. What separates analytics from disciplines like statistics and data science is generally the speed of the analysis and the focus on solving business problems.

The most common form of analytics is business analytics, which is usually used by senior leaders and decision-makers to investigate problems, validate assumptions and to guide strategic planning.

Business analysts are therefore the most common type of analyst. If you do a job search on the title analyst, as many as half the posting will likely be business analysts. However, analytics can be used in an almost limitless number of business functions in specific areas like HR, recruitment, marketing, finance, and so on. Each one can have its very own analyst.

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Analysts have been around a long time, but recent technological advances have both allowed us to produce and capture more data as well as give us the ability to analyze immense data sets quickly. Thus we are amidst a huge boom in the applications of analytics and the need for analytics talent across the globe. Analytics is something just about every business leader is trying to figure out how to use more effectively in their business. To add to our challenge, the demand for good analysts is booming just as fast as the explosion in big data.

As a result, there is a huge shortage of people who are skilled in working with data to answer questions and solve problems. This is why you have seen the number of analyst job postings increasing at an amazing rate.

If you are a business leader, manager, owner, and/or executive are not actively trying to surround yourself with analysts and if you are not infusing an analytics centric culture in your business, you will most likely soon see your business fail.

A business needs analysts to make sense of big data, manage the storage of the data, and know when to use which of the 4 types of analytics (descriptive, diagnostic, predictive, and prescriptive). To be effective, analysts need to have business intelligence tools to create data visualizations, build business dashboards and tell stories with data.

So whether you are an analyst or someone who oversees analysts, Putting Your Data to Work is designed as guidebook to help you get the most out of your business data.

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DMAIPH – Decision-making, Analytics & Intelligence Philppines

Over the past few years businesses in the Philippines have invested heavily in big data, analytics and data science, but still have not achieved the expected outcomes of data-driven companies.

Based on our learnings from the 100’s of Filipino businesses and 10,000s of Filipinos who have taken part in DMAIPH Analytics trainings all across the country, we have crafted a proven,  non-technical approach to upskilling your team in analytics.

In 2019, we will be launching two new training programs: (1) Our DMAIPH Applied Analytics Master Class series for executives, leaders and decision-makers and our (2) DMAIPH Applied Analytics Boot Camp series for practicing analysts.

TRAINING IN DATA ANALYTICS

By Maureen Andrei Lepatan

INTRODUCTION

We create data everyday. How? We, especially in this generation spend many hours in accessing our social media accounts, doing online shopping, playing games, watching movies online. Part of our daily routine includes internet and technology. By doing so, all of our hobbies generate data that are captured in various places and in different ways.

Every time we post pictures on Instagram, rant something on Twitter and post our status and photos on Facebook, we create a lot of data. There is a corresponding data point every time we comment or like something online. Imagine how many data we can generate everyday if every person of this planet accesses online.The data become closer and closer to infinity. That is why the term “big data” was created.

 With that being said, data analytics is key to handle pool of data. Analytics is about searching for clues that will enable us to find answers to our problems. We find, we analyze and we present our data.

Primary people for conducting analytics are called analysts. The problem would be that they are overwhelmed by massive amount of data and have trouble to handle them properly.

In order to be effective, analysts should master effective and current business intelligence (BI) tools that could help them to interpret the data properly and guide the companies and businesses regarding their strategies and decision making processes.

I started having interest in dealing with data when I was 3rd year in college. Before, I was a Math person. I am the kind of person who likes challenging activities and work on complex subjects. In the pursuit of my Economics degree, I used a lot of data and created graphical representations in order to survive essay crises and  loads of research papers.

Somehow, economics has the same idea as data analytics which is to tell a story out of the representations. The difference lies upon the frequency of the usage of business intelligence tools in data analytics.

Why did I dive into data analytics? It fits my personality, hobbies and skill sets. I am curious in nature and love to learn new things.  I love editing videos, photos and creating infographics and graphical representations. And data analytics made me combine all of these hobbies in data analytics. It enables me to be creative, analytical and communicative all at once. There is no wrong and right approach. I can be my own self. As long as I get the right data, visualize and verbalize them well, I’m good to go.

Data analytics gave me a sense of purpose. I think in this generation, being an effective analytics talent is what the world needs. I do not mean to disregard other jobs. I just want to be realistic about the present and the future. More and more businesses will build their companies using online platforms requiring more data analytics talents. If businesses do not adapt to the demands of the society, they will most likely fail. As a student and future professional, I need to prepare for these changes. Although I have a background in dealing with data, I need to learn timely business intelligence tools and to train myself to be a better data storyteller.

DMAIPH can help analysts and aspiring individuals who want to learn data analytics. The company conducts trainings to help increase effective and efficient analysts in the Philippines and meet the demands of the society when it comes to data enthusiasts.

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EXPERIENCE

Last September 25 and 26, I attended the training of Sir Dan Meyer regarding Data Management and Data Visualization. In a span of two days, I was able to have an overview of how data analytics works and how to use business intelligence tools to tell a story. Moreover,  I was also assigned to tasks like to welcome the guests and to assist Sir Dan in helping the participants to use Tableau since I also need to fulfill my duties as a business analytics trainee.

At first, I was really intimidated with the participants when they introduced themselves. I never thought that the people whom I say “Good Morning/ Hello” to are CEOs and various kinds of analysts in their respective companies. This really reflects that the demand for analytics talents in the Philippines is greater than the supply. When I talked to some of them, they said that companies have sent them to have trainings with Sir Dan and some of them personally wanted to learn to help their companies.

Training people is really a must to adjust in this day and age. As time goes by, more and more data are generated and unstructured data gradually increase. If data continue to produce increments, the world needs more and more analysts to handle them. In the case of the Philippines, Excel still dominates the analytics industry and is used primarily by professionals to conduct data analysis despite the evolution of  business intelligence (BI) tools. On the second day of the training, the practical application of the concepts taught in Day One were applied. Sir Dan tackled about business intelligence tools, data visualization, business dashboards and data storytelling.

I have 5 major takeaways that I want to share with you:

  1. Data Visualization is just half the job. We need to interpret the data correctly and relay the information such that a grade school student can understand the story behind the data. This is in order to create an impact to various kinds of people and encourage decision-makers to make relevant changes in their businesses. Just be simple and precise!
  2. Learning data science and analytics is all about experimentation. We shall be ready for mistakes along the way. We must continuously attend trainings in order to guide us and persistently practice on our own to obtain mastery.
  3. Companies are enchanting because people like them and trust them. As part of a company, we want to reflect the enchantment our companies have to give to the customers. Without the right strategies to be enchanting, people will not believe us leading to a low profitability and a bad reputation. We can be enchanting as analysts if we can deliver the data persuasively and we can work well with other people.
  4. Being an effective data scientist is a combination of being mobile when it comes to changes in technology and being adaptable in dealing with people.
  5. There are three types of analytics which include descriptive, predictive and prescriptive. How do we use them properly? Descriptive analytics can be effectively utilized if we want to know what happened to have insights in present trends. For example, we want to know about the profits in each month from 2015-2017. Secondly, predictive analytics is used to develop projections and provide information what might happen in the future. Expected sales can be best represented by predictive analytics. Lastly, prescriptive analytics is used to know what to do. We can use this especially if we want to build a model out of multiple sources and include many variables.

DMAIPH: FIRST TRAINING, FIRST INTERNSHIP

DMAIPH really provided me a brand new experience. Although I love dealing with data and graphical representations before I become an intern, I felt more impactful when I started my training. I got to help the participants how to navigate Tableau and had to work with wonderful people.  I was able to apply what I learned in the past and at the same time acquire new skills that will be beneficial for me in the future. I look forward to the trainings and more involvement that I can get from the company.

So far, so good.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Maureen Lepatan is an Economics student in De La Salle University and currently a business analytics intern in DMAIPH. She has a passion in data analytics especially using business intelligence tools such as Tableau and Excel. She has an eagerness to learn data structures such as SQL.

 

Revisiting “My Analytics Story” for the upcoming 3rd Edition of Putting Your Data to Work

My Analytics Story
Analytics is in many ways a new profession and up until very recently few people have seen being an analyst as career path. In fact, the majority of analysts became so by accident. To understand analytics, the first thing you should know is that there is no one, right way to analyze things.
As with my case, most analysts are drawn to analytics because they like to solve problems, have an affinity for working with data, are tech savvy and above all else… insatiably curious. By the time I first had analyst in my title, I had already been doing analytics for several years.
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Before I was even out of college I became the “Data Guy. I found my novice skills with Excel, my interest in sharing knowledge and my ability to solve problems made me highly employable. Still, there is nothing specific in my background that would suggest I’d become an analytics expert someday.
I majored in History with a plan to be a teacher and even obtained my Master’s Degree in Education. After college I started to teach, but the school I was working at went bankrupt. So I took a job with Wells Fargo Bank just to pay the bills and 15 years later I had amassed a wide range of analytics skills.
If you ask anyone with analyst in their job title, most of them have similar stories. Until recently you could not even get a degree in analytics as schools are just now offering analytics focused courses and degrees.
In 1998, I had the good fortune of being hired by Wells Fargo. The factors that contributed most to my success with the bank were two things inherit in the culture; the progressive use of data in decision-making and the accepted practice of moving up the corporate ladder by moving between departments.
If I had to pick one thing above all others that had made me a good analyst, it is my ability to quickly assess a problem and then identify the data needed to solve the problem.  For me, finding the right data is the most important trait to have and also the hardest to teach. It comes out of being curious and letting that curiosity drive you to find answers.
For 15 years that drive lead me to add new skills, learn new technologies, and develop new methods to become a proverbial jack of all trades when it comes to analytics. I often describe myself as a super hero, curiosity being my super power and the wide range of skills I’ve picked up being items on my analytics utility belt.
I am far from an expert on most of the ever increasing number of analytics tools out there, but I know what they can do and what they are good at. There are definitely a lot of people who are better at different aspects of analytics and no one can know it all. But in the end, I have become in many ways a guru of analytics.
I love talking about the fundamentals of analytics, explaining it in layman’s terms, empowering people new to the concept. I also have a passion for sharing my experience with predictive analytics models, using SQL code to write a complex series of table joins between data sources or figuring out what tool would be best use to build a business dashboard.
For the past 7 years now I have been exploring data sets, answering questions, and providing solutions here in the Philippines and loving every minute of it. Analytics… it’s more fun in the Philippines! 🙂
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DMAIPH – Decision-making, Analytics & Intelligence Philppines

Over the past few years businesses in the Philippines have invested heavily in big data, analytics and data science, but still have not achieved the expected outcomes of data-driven companies.

Based on our learnings from the 100’s of Filipino businesses and 10,000s of Filipinos who have taken part in DMAIPH Analytics trainings all across the country, we have crafted a proven,  non-technical approach to upskilling your team in analytics.

In 2019, we will be launching two new training programs: (1) Our DMAIPH Applied Analytics Master Class series for executives, leaders and decision-makers and our (2) DMAIPH Applied Analytics Boot Camp series for practicing analysts.

We will feature case studies of real Filipino run business, exercises based on actual analytics challenges being solved by Filipino analysts, and provide you with a copy of my book, Putting Your Data to Work, an analytics guidebook for the Filipino professional

Connect with us via our marketing partner, http://www.sonicanalytics.com to learn about upcoming analytics trainings and events. 

More and More Frequently I Find What I Do Being a Form of Data Evangelist

The concept of a key influencer in a field being called ad Evangelist has been around business for awhile. I remember reading how early on, called their marketing people evangelists. One the comes to mind is Guy Kawasaki, who wrote about this in his book Enchantment.

When you have something that is either new or still young in its overall adoption cycle, you need evangelists to raise awareness and being the process of acceptance.

When it comes to data evangelism, there has definitely been a number of key leaders pushing for more and more adoption of analytics across various organizations. Bernard Marr is one I have followed quite extensively.

Based on the importance so many companies have placed on analytics in recent years, you would expect to find that just about every business leader buys into the concept of using data to drive decision-making.

To be sure, the tech giants and the banks have been on board for a long time and you have seen the adoption of large-scale analytics really start to have a lasting impact among major players in fields like professional sports, the entertainment industry and politics.

And nowadays, most social media platforms have lots of built in analytics that provide instant insight into what’s hot and what’s not.

However, both factual evidence and general observation are showing this is not necessary the case across the board. We still see headlines saying things like “62% of businesses have no data analytics strategy”.

In fact, many small and medium sized companies are still not where they could be when it comes to optimizing their business data.

Three of the biggest challenges they face are not really knowing what question to ask, how to manage the data so that it is well governed and getting the data to decision-makers seamlessly.

Terms like data interpretation, data collection, data governance, and data automation are not concepts easily articulated by many business leaders.

Having a data intelligent business culture is a lot more than just buying a business intelligence tool and putting it on top of Excel.

There needs to be solid foundation in all aspects of the data life cycle, a clean and well governed data lake to house all business data, and the ability to present data impactfully.

I have found that this is often the missing element when organizations are trying to craft an analytics strategy. They focus on technology or they go out and acquire high priced talent, but in the end they struggle because not enough of their decision-makers are on the same page.

As I train groups of professionals, both in public and in in-house trainings, I find most of the attendees do not have a solid foundation in how data is collected, stored and managed. They just know how to run reports, build simple dashboards and share data in ways that do not often influence the audience as intended.

So that is what I have found myself doing hundreds of times the past several years. Helping build that foundation. Connecting the dots between the various phases of the data life cycle and helping define the data value chain. Once an organization has that down, then going out and getting a fancy new tool or bringing on data science makes sense.

Being a data evangelist is all about getting not just 1-2 executives to buy into the power of analytics, but making sure the whole organization is in a place where they can truly optimize their data, become more business intelligent and compete on the same level as the big boys when it comes to making data-driven decisions.

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DMAIPH – Decision-making, Analytics & Intelligence Philippines

Over the past few years businesses in the Philippines have invested heavily in big data, analytics and data science, but still have not achieved the expected outcomes of data-driven companies.

Based on our learnings from the 100’s of Filipino businesses and 10,000s of Filipinos who have taken part in DMAIPH Analytics trainings all across the country, we have crafted a proven, non-technical approach to upskilling your team in analytics.

In 2019, we will be launching two new training programs: (1) Our DMAIPH Applied Analytics Master Class series for executives, leaders and decision-makers and our (2) DMAIPH Applied Analytics Boot Camp series for practicing analysts.

We will feature case studies of real Filipino run business, exercises based on actual analytics challenges being solved by Filipino analysts, and provide you with a copy of my book, Putting Your Data to Work, an analytics guidebook for the Filipino professional
Connect with us via our marketing partner, http://www.sonicanalytics.com to learn about upcoming analytics trainings and events.

The Data Analyst Era

FIRST THINGS FIRST,

 

https://www.sonicanalytics.com/

Do you think this is still the career era for nurses? The era of Physical Therapist?  The Networking era? The I.T eras? Why don’t you try to type in google right now and search Most in demand jobs in the futureand you will mostly find “Analyst” on every job description in demand in the future. The worst case is that you will also discover the worst job in the future, if you have been caught on that category. I say we are here to save you.

We are here to help you start building your future right now

 

https://www.facebook.com/pg/dmaiph/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1316439141834859And be the first one to learn and know what is in demand. We are here to supply you knowledge and provide you a strong foundation in analytics. We have the same curiosity when it comes to analytics? Trust me, I’m not a big fan of numbers, but I’m wrong, I never thought analytics also plays a role in giving us a perception through data visualization with the right purpose of using numbers. Not just some numbers you need to compute instructed by your professors to do so.

 

It’s all about numbers but.

It also equips with visualization with easy number to analyze. If you notice right now visualization plays an important role in our digital age today. Because we prefer to see imagery instead of computation, we prefer reading pictures instead reading books. Analytics have the same concept and there is a huge shortage of people who are skilled in working with data to answer questions to solve problems. Sonic Analytics

Therefore, you have seen the number of analyst job postings increasing at an amazing rate. Then why not apply it into our career, use this as an asset for you to innovate.

 

For those who are interested in or just beginning a career in data analysis,

here’s a few tips to help you get started,

Be willing to learn,

Being a sponge in learning data analysis (and with any field) can only reap the benefits. With data analysis, it’s important to start small and learn the basics and foundations before moving on and tackling bigger things. learning-picture.jpg

Building a solid foundation of education in the beginning helps you know the basics and allows you to work on building your skills and knowledge as you progress through your career.

 

Don’t be afraid to ask questions and get help

You can’t do it alone, and not seeing out help can cost you opportunities as you progress through your career. Reaching out isn’t a sign of defeat or being unknowledgeable, it shows that you’re passionate and want to learn more but need the proper guidance to get you there.images

Becoming a data analyst is a great career option for those who love to work with numbers with the right tools (We will guide you) to help you and to help companies, organizations draw conclusions and arm them with the information they need to make for decision making.

If you’re a beginner,

26993474_1325177484294358_3157857508557595202_nDon’t worry, we are here to teach you the important fundamentals of data analytics step by step in a layman’s term.

Now, it’s your big chance to participate in our upcoming trainings which focuses more on teaching young professionals like you.

 

DMAIPH is proud to present this 3-day Data Analytics training that covers different aspects of data identification, collection, storage, transformation, and analysis and involve hands-on use of common data management and analysis tools such as Excel, SQL and in depth learning of the tool “Tableau”, this is also designed for those with little to no prior experience with these tools.

Analytics Experts Dan Meyer (DMAIPH) and Dominic Ligot (Cirrolytix) have joined forces to offer a unique training focusing on both the Analysis and the Management of Big Data.

Attendees will learn how to identify the right data, how data can be efficiently stored, then transformed into a friendly form for analysis, and finally how data analysis can yield insights.

Come and Join Us!

Data Analytics 3.0

February 20 – 22 | 9:00am to 5:00pm

For inquiries: info@sonicanalytics.com | marketing@sonicanalytics.com

|  (02) 959 – 8017 | 0917-799-2827

 

Register Now!

My Big Data Initiatives for 2018

As 2018 comes to a close, I plan on spending the last few weeks of the year thinking about what comes next.

Priority #1 is expanding the advocacy for more data-driven decision-making in the Philippines.

There are two components to this effort; talking about analytics to as many Filipinos as possible and continuing to hit the road and spread the advocacy to as many provinces as possible.

Priority #2 is something new.

After six years of being pretty much 100% focused on analytics in the Philippines, I will be spending some of my time back in the United States. I will be volunteering time to help educate and empower the electorate to make more data-driven decisions when it comes to exercising their vote.

My call to action for 2018 will center around three #hashtags:

#DataRockPinas

#AAPMoonshot

#BetterBringData

More to come.

Analytics Leadership – DMAIPH is a founding member of the Analytics Association of the Philippines (AAP.PH) and specializes in arming the Data-Driven Leader with the tools and techniques they need to build and empower an analytics centric organization. Analytics leadership requires a mastery of not just analytics skill, but also of nurturing an analytics culture. We have guided thousands of Filipino professionals to become better analytics leaders.

Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to discuss a uniquely tailored strategy to ensure you are the top of your game when it comes to Analytics Leadership.

 

The Scope of the Challenge of our Analytics Moonshot

Sometimes I think it helps to having had a project management experience before I dove into analytics full time. There are a lot of project management methodologies that come in handy when sizing an analytics project. Like coming up with data for a BRD.

A Business Requirements Document (BRD) includes explicit specifications of how data should be used to solve a business problem and how much it should cost depending on what it is expected to achieve.

The main goal is to deliver actionable insights by taking into consideration the data, the time allocated and the needs of the end user/audience.

The BRD must be universally agreed upon by all stakeholders involved.

The author of the BRD must understand the business processes and the key objectives of the project to ensure proper implementation.

The most important element of a BRD is the scope of the project, which includes any restrictions and constraints that need to be considered during the development process.

  1. What is the problem that the organization needs to solve?
  2. What are the restrictions that need to be considered?
  3. Is the time and money invested in solving the problem worthwhile?

So for our analytics moonshot of upskill training half a million Filipinos in the next five years, we need to start with a project management approach. So here are some considerations for our BRD:

  1. The organization (AAP.PH) and its growing legion of partners needs to facilitate the large scale training of 100,000’s of Filipinos with Data Science and Analytics (DSA) skills in the very near future. If we succeed, the economic growth of the Philippines will have a much higher chance of continued to success in a world besieged by changes from new technologies. If we fail, then I see the change of continued economic growth and prosperity being much harder of achieve here in my adopted home. So we start our scope with the audacious goal: upskill train 500,000 Filipinos to be DSA enabled professionals by the year 2022.
  2. There are many restrictions that we need to consider. Not enough experts able and willing to conduct the trainings. Not enough schools able to educate students in DSA skills. Not enough teachers with DSA knowledge. Lack of awareness among decision-makers in government, in business and in academia. The diversity of needs, with skill requirements all across the spectrum from simple reporting using excel to complex data science and predictive analytics, Nationalism and attempts to slow or reverse globalization, most interested parties work independently and there is little history of collaboration, and on and on… The only way to address all of these restrictions is share stories based on data to compel Filipinos to become part of our advocacy. The data behind why we need to get better at data is clear, its the acceptance of what the data tells us and using even more data to guide our decision-making that we need to make clear.
  3. What ever time and money investments made into this advocacy will have amazing benefits. Maybe we can’t save all call center jobs from being threatened by A.I., but we can save a lot. Maybe we can’t turn every school into an engine that produces DSA skills graduates ready to contribute day one, but we can empower a lot. And maybe we can’t help every Filipino business infuse for DSA into their processes, but we an help 1,000’s. The time is now, The money is there. We just need to line things up so that our moonshot succeeds. And when we do, the Philippines will be a world hub for analytics unlike any other nation, primed and ready to deliver world class DSA services both domestically and abroad.

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Analytics Leadership – DMAIPH is a founding member of the Analytics Association of the Philippines (AAP.PH) and specializes in arming the Data-Driven Leader with the tools and techniques they need to build and empower an analytics centric organization. Analytics leadership requires a mastery of not just analytics skill, but also of nurturing an analytics culture. We have guided thousands of Filipino professionals to become better analytics leaders. Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to discuss a uniquely tailored strategy to ensure you are the top of your game when it comes to Analytics Leadership.

The Analytics Association of the Philippines and our DSA Moonshot

When I think about what we can accomplish with the AAP I think about some pretty big stuff.

Moonshot kind of stuff.

It took more then just a government initiative to put a man on the moon. It took an effort of thousands. And the support of millions.

For the AAP, our moonshot starts with advocacy which comes in the form of doing as much talking about DSA as possible.

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Raising awareness among decision-makers is key. It is no longer an awareness about what is DSA (Data Science & Analytics). People get it.

Now it is an awareness of how Filipinos can use DSA in their  business.

I get excited thinking about how the AAP  can focus our message as thought leaders and look to continue to complement each other in ways that individual companies could never dream of.

We have been actively looking for speaking opportunities to push the message that DSA in the Philippines is of paramount importance.  In many ways, even a matter of national security when you look at the threats of Artificial Intelligence, nationalism and political instability… impact OFWS and BPOs directly. The two biggest source of revenue in the country.

Outside the core group who have come together to get the association off the ground, we can empower the multitude of interested parties to help too spread our advocacy too.

I see us sharing our message of collaboration and the idea that a rising tide lifts all boats across every industry and from all sectors. Big and small, domestic and international, size and scope don’t really matter, we all need more analytics in our businesses.

If we get enough key players on board with the advocacy we will have a legit change to actually upskiil train 500,000 Filipinos to be DSA enabled in the next 5 years. That is the moon shot goal I’m dreaming about.

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Analytics Leadership – DMAIPH is a founding member of the Analytics Council of the Philippines and specializes in arming the Data-Driven Leader with the tools and techniques they need to build and empower an analytics centric organization. Analytics leadership requires a mastery of not just analytics skill, but also of nurturing an analytics culture.

We have guided thousands of Filipino professionals to become better analytics leaders. Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to discuss a uniquely tailored strategy to ensure you are the top of your game when it comes to Analytics Leadership.

 

Augmented Analytics: A.I., Machine Learning & Predictive Analytics

I recently spoke about Augmented Analytics: Trends in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Predictive Analytics.

Much has been made about the business implications of recent, rapid advancements in cognitive computing.

It’s no longer just a pair of eyes scanning data.

We now face the reality of advanced analytics tools to help human knowledge workers glean actionable insight from vast and deep lakes of historical, transactional and machine-generated information.

This is augmented analytics and it includes concepts like predictive analytics, machine learning and A.I. If these are terms you have a general familiarity with, but haven’t spent much time thinking about how the related to big data, analytics and data science, then you should.

Business analytics today can be done with MS Excel and maybe a good BI tool, but business analytics tomorrow will require augmented analytics skills.

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Analytics in the Philippines – The Philippines is at the center of the action when it comes to solutions to the global need for analytics. Blessed with a solid foundation of young, educated and English speaking workforce, companies around the world are look for Filipino analytics talent to fill analytics positions.

DMAIPH was set up to facilitate these solutions and bring the talent and the business together. And that is exactly why I wrote Putting Your Data to Work, the first analytics guidebook designed specifically for the Philippines. Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly so we can help you take advantage of this unique global opportunity.