It’s an Entrepreneur’s Life for Me

I came across this article recently that really hit home.

The gist of the article was how people who are driven, passionate and successful are often alone.

There have definitely been times over the last decade that I have been my own boss that I’ve felt alone.

However, most of the time I’m not alone. I have always worked hard to surrounded myself with people who get what it meas to be successful. Ones with a great work ethic, have a vision and possess integrity.

So when I read the article, which the above quote is a paraphrase of, I felt the need to share it and explain what it means to me.

“Not everyone is going to understand how you mind works.” This is 100% accurate. Most of the people in my life have a job. They don’t get what it means to want to work 100 hours a week so I don’t have to work 40. The freedom that comes with being self-employed makes it like most of the time I’m not even working. Teaching, training, going to meetings, conference calls, etc… they rarely feel like work. They feel like me living the life I was destined to live.

You’d think most people who think that is cool and it would inspire them as well. But it doesn’t.

Sometimes I’ve been able to impact people and move them forward towards being a successful business owner, but most of them thank me for my time and thoughts, and then go back to the life they know. “There are many people out there who are willing to settle for less.”

Now this is not a judgement by any means, its just a fact. I was like that for most of my life. I didn’t really think about doing my own thing until I was 40. I never saw it as settling, just doing what I thought was the best way to provide for my family. It wasn’t until I got to a level of expertise in my field (analytics) that I rediscovered my passion for teaching and found a way to merge the two.

Now as I do what I do, its with a great amount of “intense” passion. I live it. That scare people. It shouldn’t, but it does. People have so many forces working against them to keep them in place. It’s not easy to throw off the yoke, and break free into the world of entrepreneurship.

So this leads me back to the central theme of joining masterminds and surrounding yourself with leaders and doers and people of action.

It is the best way to meet the challenge of being alone.

1*i1tcIs8D1KDqZeBrRn6Guw

Daniel Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics firm with offices in Manila, the San Francisco Bay Area and Ocala, FL. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and offers big data coaching and analytics training seminars on both sides of the Pacific. Dan has also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker.

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

As citizens of this great democracy, we need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). This approach to a data savvy work force starts in school. So, we started an internship program to empower our youth to use Analytics, plan Strategy and Present their insights… ASP!

When not training current and future analysts, you can find Dan championing the use of analytics to empower data-driven citizenship by volunteering his expertise with schools and non-profits dedicated to evidence-based social progress like Saint Leo University’s Women in STEAM 2020 Conference.

My Superhero Origin Story

My superhero origin story started against the backdrop of the 2008–2009 Financial Crisis. Let me explain a short history here, so stick with me. During the financial crisis, there was a bank that went bankrupt called Wachovia. If you are not aware of Wachovia, they were a bank that started on the East Coast and over time they spread westward, while Wells Fargo started in California and moved eastward. Wells Fargo was one of the few banks that was able to wither the financial crisis pretty solidly and when Wells Fargo acquired Wachovia, it was a pretty big deal for a number of reasons.

We did money transfers aka remittances, where people send money from the US to family and loved ones overseas. It is quite common for people that come to the US to work or to live still have family overseas, that they are responsible for. To support them, they sent money back to help pay for things like their parents’ retirement, or to help their brother or sister set up a business, or they are paying for their nieces and nephews’ education… whatever it may be. This is a big business; in fact, Wells Fargo had a goal of trying to get towards the top of that industry.

Our sights were clearly set on Western Union, being the market leader, and we put a lot of resources into the soon to be converted Wachovia branches in Florida. The goal within the bank, within my team, was to be able to get me number two one the merger was final. We would pass MoneyGram, pass, all the other money transfer operators and put Wells Fargo up there, right behind Western Union.

Now I don’t say that to brag, but around the same time this merger was happening, I realized that I was different. I had a level of skill that set me apart from most of the other analysts working at Wells Fargo during my tenure. This skill, which I had progressively been developing over the year, was my ability to take large, complex data sets from a variety of sources and blend them together to see trends and patterns that most analysts would likely miss.

Like with any superhero origin, when faced with a big challenge, a new power emerges that empowers the hero to save the day. And that’s exactly what happened.

Getting back to Wachovia and Wells Fargo, Wachovia was a diversified financial services company based in Charlotte, North Carolina. Before its acquisition by Wells Fargo and Company in 2008, Wachovia was the fourth-largest bank holding company in the United States, based on total assets. The acquisition of Wachovia by Wells Fargo was completed on December 31, 2008, after a government-forced sale to avoid Wachovia’s failure. The Wachovia brand was absorbed into the Wells Fargo brand in a process that lasted three years. source

This was a pretty big deal, because Wells Fargo up into that point did not have branches in the state of Florida. Wells Fargo had never set up shop in Florida, which is a very diverse state, with a lot of immigrants and first-generation citizens who send money to families abroad.

People who are likely to send money back to their homeland, or to their country their parents came from, and so when they do that that is a great opportunity for Wells Fargo. As the Wachovia branches were rebranded as Wells Fargo, we could use them to send our money transfer service. In fact, we would be the first bank in Florida to be able to send money through a bank which would give the customers have much better benefit than sending through a money transfer service.

Needless to say, everyone was excited. As we finalized marketing plans, I was in a staff meeting and we were talking about what we were going to do when we are able to finally have rebranded stores. We were ready to acquire tens of thousands of new customers and sign them up for the Express Send Service. With this huge opportunity in front of us, the marketing meeting, was about the plans for the launch of the remittance product in Florida.

The marketing team had a whole bunch of events planned, our communications strategy was shared, and we picked a rebranded store in Miami, where we were going to have a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Our plan included inviting local dignitaries the local news, etc; was expected to to make a big splash. We are going to launch in Miami, and on the surface, it made sense because Miami is the biggest city of Florida. The city’s population has incredibly high percentage of immigrants and first-generation Americans, our key target.

However, what I thought in my head, as we are going through all this stuff in the media was that most of the people that have migrated to Florida come from countries that Wells Fargo has not traditionally sent money to. Now, take a step back remember, I said Wells Fargo was a west coast centric bank, most of the money that Wachovia customers send overseas goes to places around the Pacific, China India the Philippines and Mexico.

In addition, we had pretty big markets in Central America like El Salvador, Guatemala. That is where our sweet spot had been for the past several years. Wachovia is East Coast centric; their branches are in parts of country where a lot of people that migrated to the US don’t come from the same markets they do in the West Coast. They come from the Caribbean, they come from South America…. i.e. Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Haiti. This population of remitters was not one that Wells Fargo had a lot of history sending money to. Here we are excited about sending money overseas, about helping our employee, our customers, be able to send money to their loved ones and yet I’m thinking we have a problem.

Long story short, this is an issue for me because I looked at the data in my head. What I have known previously about the demographics of the area and populations in the state of Florida. Because being a data guy, I know a lot about the graphic data and geographical distribution of our customer base and the digital customers.

So, I raised my hand, I explained to everyone in the meeting, exactly what I just shared with you. The whole thing about, Miami not being the best place to launch in Florida, that its somewhere where we are not going to have a big turnout of new customers. I added that because we are not traditionally sending money to their home countries, this entire plan will fall flat.

I expected that to be enough. The data spoke for itself.

However, everyone was kind of like “well yeah that makes sense Daniel, but you know we’re locked in we’re still going ahead with Miami”.

Basically, I got out voted.

It was time to find a phone booth and put on my cape.

Daniel Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics firm with offices in Manila, the San Francisco Bay Area and Ocala, FL. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and offers big data coaching and analytics training seminars on both sides of the Pacific. Dan has also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker.

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

As citizens of this great democracy, we need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). This approach to a data savvy work force starts in school. So, we started an internship program to empower our youth to use Analytics, plan Strategy and Present their insights… ASP!

When not training current and future analysts, you can find Dan championing the use of analytics to empower data-driven citizenship by volunteering his expertise with schools and non-profits dedicated to evidence-based social progress like Saint Leo University’s Women in STEAM 2020 Conference.

I Need a Writer’s Virtual Apprentice

Building THE Top Analytics Brand in the Philippines

DMAIPH was the culmination of a dream. A dream to empower people to make more data-driven decisions! My goal is simply to train and educate fresh graduates and young professionals how to use analytics to embark on their career as an analyst.

From June 2014… “As many of you know, analytics is something I love to teach, train and talk about. In fact I’ve gotten so into it that I’m now the analytics guru for a couple of different companies…. BPO Elite, Medexcel, etc. DMAIPH though is 100% me. This is my umbrella organization dedicated soley to sharing my love of data! “

DMAIPH achieved my goal that started with BPO Elite. That goal has now grown to include both DMAIPH and Sonic Analytics.

img_0121

Daniel Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics firm with offices in Manila, the San Francisco Bay Area and Ocala, FL. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and offers big data coaching and analytics training seminars on both sides of the Pacific. Dan has also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker. 

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

As citizens of this great democracy, we need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). This approach to a data savvy work force starts in school. So, we started an internship program to empower our youth to use Analytics, plan Strategy and Present their insights… ASP!

When not training current and future analysts, you can find Dan championing the use of analytics to empower data-driven citizenship by volunteering his expertise with schools and non-profits dedicated to evidence-based social progress like Saint Leo University’s Women in STEAM 2020 Conference.

 

Moving Data Around the World w/Sonic Analytics

I’ve had the honor of heading Sonic Analytics, an analytics firm with offices in Manila, the San Francisco Bay Area and Ocala, FL since 2014. With over 20 years in Big Data, I am fortunate to be one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and offers big data coaching and analytics training seminars on both sides of the Pacific. I have also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker. 

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

As citizens of this great democracy, we need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). This approach to a data savvy work force starts in school. So, we started an internship program to empower our youth to use Analytics, plan Strategy and Present their insights… ASP!

When not training current and future analysts, you can find Dan championing the use of analytics to empower data-driven citizenship by volunteering his expertise with schools and non-profits dedicated to evidence-based social progress like Saint Leo University’s Women in STEAM 2020 Conference.

 

Thoughts of a Professional Public Speaker

Having some time off between speaking gigs, I have been reflecting a lot on how to level up what I do. I have been talking about analytics, data science and lately artificial intelligence all across the United States and the Philippines.

I’ve trained over 8,000 analysts, given over 200 talks and worked on over 50 big data projects the past several years. In that time I have learned a lot about how I deliver content and empower my audience.

I have heard at least 500 talk from other speakers and watched 100’s of video talks. So when I reflect on my speaking, I take all this in. I came up with these tips:

· Design each talk so that it mirrors what one would get from the 1st hour of coaching.

· As a speaker, you have about seven seconds to solidity first impressions, what do you do in your first 7 seconds?

· You need to be selective with your content. You can’t help everyone, so don’t try. Focus on giving content to those who are ready to make sense of it.

· I get paid for access to my brain. Think of coaching and training with an expert that way. How valuable is to have insight into the mind of an expert.

· What is your post interaction accountability? How are attendees held accountable to stick to their initial acknowledgement that this is an area where they need help?

· Meet with 2 people a day, follow up with each one personally. This is so much harder than it seems. Automate it, outsource it, do what it takes to keep it going.

· Develop a physical product you can giveaway that take people back to your story and ties them to an emotional experience. Something to do with being a self-taught data guy.

· Prior to the event, develop a purpose driven message. Create 2–3 talking points and a call to action (attend). Use both storytelling and story selling.

When I talk, it is always a process of evolution. Taking these steps to enhance my talks will allow me to deliver even more value, not just as a speaker, but a consultant, trainer and coach as well.

Daniel Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics firm with offices in Manila, the San Francisco Bay Area and as of February 2019, Ocala, FL. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and offers big data coaching and analytics training seminars on both sides of the Pacific. Dan has also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker.

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

As citizens of this great democracy, we need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). This approach to a data savvy work force starts in school. So, we started an internship program to empower our youth to use Analytics, plan Strategy and Present their insights… ASP!

When not training current and future analysts, you can find Dan championing the use of analytics to empower data-driven citizenship by volunteering his expertise with schools and non-profits dedicated to evidence-based social progress like Saint Leo University’s Women in STEAM 2020 Conference.

Grab a Big Data Surfboard or Get Left Behind!

“Land was wealth 300 years ago. So, the person who owned the land owned the wealth. Later wealth was in factories and production, and America rose to dominance. The industrialist owned the wealth. Today, wealth is in information. And the person who has the most timely information owns the wealth. The problem is that information flies around the world at the speed of light. The new wealth cannot be contained by boundaries and borders as land and factories were. The changes will be faster and more dramatic. There will be a dramatic increase in number of new multimillionaires. There also will be those left behind.”

Two things strike me in this quote by Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad Poor Dad.

The first is that it incapsulates the world we live in now. A world where information is power. We see this in practice today as the biggest companies now are the ones who use data the same way companies 100 years ago used oil. Nothing new here.

The second thing is that those who control the information will be successful and more importantly those who do, not, will be left behind. This my biggest fear right now. Watching so many businesses being left behind because they don’t have control of information.

Experts have talked about Industry 4.0, the Information Age, the power of Big Data, etc. ad nauseum. But people are not talking much about those being left behind. At least not in the context of being data-driven.

The past two years we have talked a lot about the Trump voter, feeling left behind financially. But we aren’t talking much about the data starved companies that employed a lot of them.

We all know that automation, innovation and globalization combined to spell the end of a lot of companies. But we don’t really talk about how the same companies ultimately ended up failing because they didn’t understand how to use their data better.

Big Data represents a massive wave of disruption that will continue to smash companies like a tsunami. Only those who can ride the wave successfully will be prepared. Analytics is our surfboard to make sure our organization doesn’t get left behind and that we are able to surf the Big Data wave.

Those that master analytics are the new multimillionaire that Kiyosaki mentions. They use data science, build predictive models and have figured out machine learning and artificial intelligence.

The ones that are left behind are the ones still using MS Excel to do rudimentary reporting. Even ones who have started using some basic business intelligence tools and are gaining valuable insight from their data will struggle against the bigger, more data-driven competitors that make multimillionaires of the best data surfers.

One way to know if your organization is in trouble is ask this one simple question. Does the way data is used inside your business look like the way data is used in your personal life? Can we do at work what we can do with Facebook, Netflix, Amazon, Google, etc. at home?

In most cases there is probably a pretty big gap. We process data at work in batches, sometimes only at month end. The analysis takes days and the reports we use to make decisions are only looking at the past. We know who our customers have been, but we are guess who they will be in the future. We hire people not on who is likely to bring the most value to our business, but the one with the best resume and the best interview skills. Does any of this sound familiar?

If it does than that sound you hear in the background, getting louder and starting to impact what you do is the wave of disruption.

If you don’t want to be left behind, crushed by big data, and you want your organization to keep making millionaires than you had better start learning to surf and to do that, you will need a high-quality board.

Dan Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics advocacy with offices in Manila, the San Francisco Bay Area and as of February 2019, Ocala, FL. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and has recently begun offering public training seminars in the United States. Dan has also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker.

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

As citizens of this great democracy, we need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). This approach to a data savvy work force starts in school. So, we started an internship program to empower our youth to use Analytics, plan Strategy and Present their insights… ASP!

When not training current and future analysts, you can find Dan championing the use of analytics to empower data-driven citizenship by volunteering his expertise with schools and non-profits dedicated to evidence-based social progress like Saint Leo University’s Women in Data + Science Program and the Data + Women of Tampa Meet Up Group.

Amazon Will Spend $Millions Up Skilling Its Workforce.. Shouldn’t You?

Saw this article in the New York Times Today

If Amazon is investing in up skill training, because they can see what’s coming, why wouldn’t everyone else? Offering companies analytics and data science up skill training seems like a sound business model right? And that my friends, is why we have Sonic Analytics.

Give you and your team access to skills on the future. #dataspark#sonicanalytics#dataiswealth

I ran a data science-centric program the past 18 months to do just this for Accenture’s Philippines operation. We put over 500 Accenture employees through our Applied Analytics Training Series covering topics like Data Mining, Blending and Visualization, discussed case studies by the likes of Google, Best Buy and HP, and conducted exercises giving attendees a chance to design business dashboard prototypes, build predictive models in Excel and practice data story telling. We can do the same for you.

Dan Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics advocacy with offices in Manila, the San Francisco Bay Area and as of February 2019, Ocala, FL. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and has recently begun offering public training seminars in the United States. Dan has also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker.

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

Putting Your Data to Work. Let’s Get Started

For those of you who follow me and have not yet attended one of my trainings, I want to share with you what we do. Here are some excerpts from a recent talk I gave in Chicago with Powerteam International.

Let’s talk about how to master your data to increase your income. Over the next couple of blog posts I’m going to walk you through some tips on how to increase the insight you glean from your data and use that to increase yyour income. We’re going to cover five things.

First of all, we’re going to talk about how big data is a wave of disruption. It’s causing massive disruptions in every industry and every type of business. We’re going to talk about how data analytics is a process. You have to be able to understand the entire process, to be able to master the data in your business.

Next, we’re going talk about how to find the right data at the right time. Like anything worth finding, this will require a map. You have to be able to look at your data throughout your business like you’re mapping something and going from start to finish.

We will next cover talking making impactful data visualizations. It is actually something that is quite hard to do, so I am going to talk about some tips on how to make some better visualizations.

Then finally we will cover storytelling with data, which is how you influence decision makers.

To recap…

1. Big Data is Disruption

2. Analytics as a Process

3. Finding the Right Data

4. Data Visualization

5. Storytelling with Data

I generally cover this subject matter over a two-day course, but for written consumption I have condensed it.

I have made it very layman.

So, we’re not going sit here and go through a lot of complicated technical stuff. This is more of a high-level perspective of my experience. Of what I know about analytics and why I want to share with you.

A little about me, so I have about 20 plus years of experience working with analytics or data analysis work. Most of my professional experience came with Wells Fargo Bank.

I worked for 15 years with Wells Fargo’s as a senior analyst. For the last seven or eight years though after I left Wells Fargo, I set up my own business. I’ve been teaching people how to be analysts. Talking to companies about how to use more data in their decision-making. Talking to people about how to really level up with their business.

I’ve been doing a lot of that in Asia and I just recently moved to Florida. I am expanding my business towards the East Coast and up here in Chicago. I also have a master’s in education. I was a teacher before I was an analyst. My favorite thing to do is talk about analytics in a way that could help empower people. This is me fulfilling my destiny.

I have a company called Sonic Elevate. Since 2011, we have trained over 8,000 people. Conducted over 186 trainings. We’ve worked on over 50 projects across Southeast Asia.

We at Sonic, work with a wide range of companies, a broad spectrum of types of businesses. The one thing they all have in common is they all have a lot of data and they’re all struggling to use that data effectively. It doesn’t matter how big or how powerful or how amazing a company is. They have to really look at data in a way that allows them to constantly optimize this.

I want to share with you a few of those things that some of these companies do within the framework of the outline I listed above.

Big Data, Analytics, Data Governance, Data Visualization and Storytelling with Data.

If you want to attend a training or set up some time for a 1 on 1 coaching session, let’s connect.

https://www.coachtheworld.com/en/dataiswealth

Dan Meyer heads Sonic Analytics, an analytics advocacy with offices in Manila, the San Francisco Bay Area and as of February 2019, Ocala, FL. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and has recently begun offering public training seminars in the United States. Dan has also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker.

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

As citizens of this great democracy, we need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). This approach to a data savvy work force starts in school. So, we started an internship program to empower our youth to use Analytics, plan Strategy and Present their insights… ASP!

When not training current and future analysts, you can find Dan championing the use of analytics to empower data-driven citizenship by volunteering his expertise with schools and non-profits dedicated to evidence-based social progress like Saint Leo University’s Women in Data + Science Program and the Data + Women of Tampa Meet Up Group.

Building Businesses By Doing Things Many Don’t Do

Early in my career, I realized that I had a very in-demand skill, something that people really needed in the business. I knew how to use Microsoft Excel. The ability to make spreadsheets and turn them into reports and to do analysis, surprisingly, was something I had a natural talent for.

It’s actually quite amusing to think how my entire career trajectory benefited from my innate ability makes sense of large files of numbers in a speadsheet. I was able to start doing that on a regular basis, making reports and doing different types of business analysis work that added a lot of value to the bank. Making sure we targeted the marketing of our products to specific, much more likely to buy, geographic and demographic groups accelerated the adoption rate and drove up cross sell of additional products.

Before I knew it I had a 15 year career with Wells Fargo and in that time, I got to do all kinds of analytics from end to end. Bringing in new data, structuring it, putting it in databases, and figuring out how to extract insight and report to senior management was something I got really, really good at.

After years of great experiences, working on huge data science projects and working across various teams to roll out complex analytics solutions. So, after doing that for the bank, I went into business myself as an analytics expert. I’ve spent the last decade working with a wide range of companies helping them level up their use of data.

Now, I am working small business owner and entrepreneurs as Icoach them into how to look at their data the same way Wells Fargo looks at its data. I help them implement analytics systems and processes — solutions that will help them mimic what the big successful multinational companies are doing with their data —so then they can be more competitive. That opportunity to coach them and give them a chance to be successful is what’s driving me.

It all starts with a commitment to start doing things that most other businesses aren’t doing very well or even at all.

Sharing an excerpt from a recent issue of Success Profiles Magazine that I was featured in. Thanks to Brian K. Wright and Bill Walsh for the opportunity!

Francisco Bay Area and as of February 2019, Ocala, FL. With over 20 years in Big Data, Dan is one of the most sought-after public speakers in Asia and offers big data coaching and analytics training seminarson both sides of the Pacific. Dan has also recently joined the Powerteam International family as a small business analytics resource speaker.

Sonic Analytics(www.sonicanalytics.com) brings big data analytics solutions like business intelligence, business dashboards and data storytelling to small and medium sized organizations looking to enhance their data-driven decision-making capabilities. We also advocate the use of analytics for civic responsibility through training, consulting and education.

As citizens of this great democracy, we need to look at the data (analytics), plan a course of action (strategy) and share our data-driven viewpoints (presentation). This approach to a data savvy work force starts in school. So, we started an internship program to empower our youth to use Analytics, plan Strategy and Present their insights… ASP!

When not training current and future analysts, you can find Dan championing the use of analytics to empower data-driven citizenship by volunteering his expertise with schools and non-profits dedicated to evidence-based social progress like Saint Leo University’s Women in Data + Science Program and the Data + Women of Tampa Meet Up Group.