Global Demand for Analytics and Data Science Talent

There are not enough analytics experts and data scientists to go around.

I say this a lot.

Just did a quick google search to put some recent data points and commentary to back up what I say.

The mass adoption of big data has seen companies across sectors scramble to hire enough data scientists to glean insights and drive decision making.

A decade ago, explaining data science to employers was challenging. Few people understood the value of a skill set that combines computer science, statistics, operations research, engineering, business insights and strategy and the impact it can have on a business.

But things have changed over the last five years. Not only has the term “data science” become commonplace, but data scientists have become highly sought after in the marketplace

According to a 2015 MIT Sloan Management Review, 40 percent of the companies surveyed were struggling to find and retain the data analytics talent. And the picture is starting to look even bleaker.

International Data Corporation (IDC) predicts a need by 2018 for 181,000 people with deep analytical skills, and a requirement five times that number for jobs with the need for data management and interpretation skills.

A report by McKinsey & Company is frequently referenced, stating that by 2018, the United States alone could face a shortage of 140,000 to 190,000 people with deep analytical skills as well as 1.5 million managers and analysts with the know-how to use the analysis of big data to make effective decisions.

Deloitte’s Analytics Trends 2016 report notes that while there is a rising number of university analytics and data science programs (more than 100 just in the U.S.), they nonetheless can’t crank out enough sufficiently trained people to meet demand.

Consequently, the report recommends that companies should:

  • Actively recruit on campuses with data analytics programs.
  • Develop internships and student projects both as a recruiting tool and to groom students for an efficient transition to the general business world and company culture.
  • Establish meaningful and rewarding career paths with an infrastructure in place most likely to interest and attract new talent.

In a recent blog post, Facebook listed a number of tips for students to prepare for such fields. Chief among them: “Take all the math you can possibly take,” including probability and statistics. (And while you’re at it, the company recommends, make sure you take some computer science, and try to squeeze in engineering, economics, philosophy of knowledge, and the latest brain research, too.)

One of the reasons I am so bullish about 2017, is that appetite for analytics and datas science is through the roof. Finally, everyone is starting to get serious about how to infuse their decision-making with more data.

DMAIPH specializes in empowering and enabling leaders, managers, professionals and students with a mastery of analytics fundamentals. Contact DMAIPH now at analytics@dmaiph.com or connect with me directly to find out what we can do to help you acquire the analytics mastery you and your organization need to be successful in today’s data-driven global marketplace.

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Sources

http://www.business.com/recruiting/big-data-big-problem-coping-with-shortage-of-talent-in-data-analysis/

https://techcrunch.com/2015/12/31/how-to-stem-the-global-shortage-of-data-scientists/

https://content.pivotal.io/blog/mckinsey-report-highlights-the-impending-data-scientist-shortage

http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/digital-mckinsey/our-insights/big-data-the-next-frontier-for-innovation

https://code.facebook.com/posts/384869298519962/artificial-intelligence-revealed/

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Global Demand for Analytics and Data Science Talent

    1. Demographic Data is a key part of the analysis done by analysts and data scientists. As is marketing data, sales data, competitor data, etc.

    1. Thanks for your interest Mark, in short, a data scientist runs complicated models, programming and higher math to help solve complex business problems, while data analysts analysis the data within in a business to provide insights for management to take action. Hope that helps.

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